blog imag32.png

Manufacturers Looking For Total Value From National 3PLs Are Missing the Strategic Value Needed to Drive Stronger Growth

Some customers hesitate to work with a regional partner for fear of “putting all of their eggs in one basket.” However, doing business with a nationwide behemoth can trap them in a swamp of bureaucracy. While I worked at nationwide 3PLs like Schneider, I used name recognition to open doors and find opportunities with manufacturers without realizing that our customers were not seeing the true strategic value. Nationwide 3PLs claim to leverage stronger networks to provide cost savings, but in reality, lack the dexterity to be able to flex to meet customer requirements. This leads to customer frustration, poor service, and ultimately greater cost on the back-end.

Topics: warehouse DC

Poor Final Mile Customer Experiences Lead Many Midwest Manufacturers to Bring Products Closer to Plants

As I mentioned in my Journal of Commerce article, “Reducing the Transport Risk in US Manufacturing Supply Chains”, many midwest manufacturers are looking for alternative import approaches to bring raw materials closer to their plants. They want to protect their operations, the supply chain and their customers as they are frustrated with final mile delays, breaks in production, inconsistent product flows to customers when using East Coast ports to manage freight moving into the U.S. Increased costs compound the issue and are felt by manufacturers and end customers.

Topics: warehouse Port

Manufacturers Have Little Control Over Inventory Turns & their 3PLs Are Focused Elsewhere

Studies show that the typical cost of carrying inventory is 10.6% of the inventory value. The highest performing manufacturers with the most profitability growth potential spend 7.4% while the lowest performers spend double on inventory (up to 14%!) Because there is a 77% correlation between profitability and inventory turns, it’s important for manufacturers to keep inventory levels as low as possible and to sell inventory as quickly as possible.

Topics: logistics third party logistics WHAT IF logistics warehouse

Warehouses & DCs Will Cost Manufacturers Up to 3% Profit Margin Loss with an Inability to Give Walmart Product On-time, In Full

On-time, in-full scores for Wal-Mart’s top 75 suppliers -- including  Unilever -- had been as low as 10 percent. Not one had reached the 95 percent long-term target, hurting the retailer's ability to improve product availability to compete with Amazon, which provides consumers with the products they want, when they want it at the price they want it. The retailer is losing an estimated $1B due to product unavailability as products are not being shipped on time, in full or products are arriving too early cluttering back rooms slowing time-to-shelf.

Topics: 3PL warehouse DC

Forklift Safety

  1. Qualified Operators Only –
    • Only those employees who have been trained, authorized and licensed should operate materials handling equipment.
  2. Wear Appropriate Clothing –
    • Operators should be appropriately dressed - the correct safety equipment, including hi-visibility jacket, safety shoes and hard-hats (where appropriate) should always be worn. 
    • Remember loose clothing can become caught on the truck or may interfere with controls.
  3. Equipment Inspection –
    • Materials handling equipment should always be thoroughly inspected and daily checks made before starting work with the shift supervisor being informed if any problems are identified. 
    • Equipment which requires repair should never be operated and repairs and maintenance only carried out by qualified technicians.
  4. Start Your Day Right –
    • Never operate materials handling equipment with wet or greasy hands or shoes as they could slide off the controls and cause an accident.
    • Always use the steps and hand grabs provided to get on and off the equipment. (3point contact)
    • Before commencing work ensure that a comfortable operating position is found and all controls are within easy reach. The armrest, seat position and mirrors should be correctly adjusted and the safety belt should always be fastened. 
    • Never operate a lift truck unless you are in the operator's seat and keep arms, legs and head inside the confines of the truck at all times. 
  5. Hazard Avoidance –
    • Avoid bumps, holes, loose materials and use extra caution when the floor is slippery. 
    • Do not drive over objects such as pieces of wood scattered on the ground as doing this could cause the load to move or control of equipment could be lost. 
    • Reduce the speed of equipment and use the horn when in the proximity of corners, exits, entrances, stairways, doors, pedestrian walkways and in the vicinity of other employees.
  6. Load Stability –
    • Handle loads carefully and check them closely for stability and balance before raising, lowering or moving off. Falling loads can cause injury and damage.
    • Travel with the load tilted back and the forks as low as possible as this will increase the stability of the equipment being operated. 
    • Never travel with the forks raised high above the floor or turn with the forks in an elevated position or tilted forward. 
    • Look out for overhead obstructions when lifting, lowering or stacking loads. 
    • Be alert to the possibility of falling loads when stacking.
  7. Maintain Good Visibility –
    • Carrying a load close to the floor provides good forward visibility. 
    • Operate equipment in reverse when the load restricts visibility, except when moving up ramps. 
    • Ensure that there is a good view of the rack or the top of a stack when positioning a load. 
    • When reversing ensure the forks are tilted back completely and confirm that the load is safely secured before moving off. 
    • If visibility remains obstructed always stop and confirm it is safe to proceed.
  8. Correct Equipment Use –
    • Do not let other people ride on the equipment unless a second seat is fitted. Fork lift trucks for example are designed to carry loads, not people.
    • Do not use forklift trucks to lift people. If a person has to be lifted, use only a securely attached work platform and cage and follow the appropriate operating instructions.
  9. Refueling –
    • Equipment should only be recharged or refuelled at specially designated locations.
    • Always switch off equipment while being recharged or refuelled. 
    • Refueling of engine powered trucks should take place in a well-ventilated, spark and flame free area.
  10. End of Shift –
    • Always park equipment in the designated or authorized area.
    • Fully lower forks to the floor and apply the park brake. 
    • Turn the equipment "off" and remove the key. 

 

Topics: Safety warehouse Forklift

Setting Warehouse Goals for 2018

When determining goals, they need to be Specific, Measureable, Attainable, Realistic or result focused, and Timely.

Topics: 3PL warehouse

What is the Importance of Customer Service in the Logistics Industry?

Customer service, more often than not, is the backbone of any industry. Whether you’re in retail, entertainment or, yes, logistics, your customer service can play a huge part in how people view your company and how your company functions. 

Topics: warehouse

The History Behind Veterans Day

Original article can be found HERE

Topics: Transportation 3PL warehouse Veterans

Warehouse Safety

At RGL it is important that our employees go home safe, healthy, and fulfilled everyday.  Safety is at the core of our values.  Below
is a great article on warehouse safety.

Warehousing affects how materials are received, stored, and distributed within a facility and shipped to customers.  With a great amount of inventory to control, deadlines to meet, and employees to oversee, warehouses may create more hazards than other areas.  When working in a warehouse, it is important to keep safety in mind at all times and to remain focused on the task at hand.

Topics: culture Contract Packaging Safety warehouse

What is a Public Warehouse?

Definition: A public warehouse is a business that provides short or long-term storage to companies on a month-to-month basis. Public warehouse fees can be a combination of storage fees and inbound and outbound transaction fees. A public warehouse can charge per pallet or charge for each square foot that is used by a company.

Topics: Outsourcing warehouse